new adult books

Announcing IF I FORGET YOU

I announced my forthcoming novel, IF I FORGET YOU, a few weeks ago in my newsletter, but today I’m publicly announcing the novel and showing the cover. Yay!

michelle-d-argyle-if-i-forget-you-smaller-for-post

IF I FORGET YOU has been a tough book for me to write and to publish. Some days I try to talk myself out of publishing it all together because the main character is so much like me. I forget the most basic, simple things like people’s names and faces, even if I’m met them multiple times and had meaningful interactions with them. I’ve often been embarrassed by mixing up two or three different people and calling them the wrong name or referring to something that happened with the other person, not them. I forget important dates and events like nobody’s business. Just ask my friends.

I’m terrified that I’ll put this book out there and readers will not believe a character could be so ridiculously forgetful … when I’ve been just like her for most of my life. But, that’s the price an author pays for wanting to publish their work, and I’m just biting the bullet and doing it. If anything, putting this book out there makes it easier for me to say if someone reads it, they’ll understand me as a person just a tad better.

Avery Hollister is a little more than absentminded. She has trouble remembering faces, names, and dates without her piles of lists and Post-it notes. When she heads off to college it takes her a week to realize the guy she’s crushing on is, in fact, three different guys. With a faulty memory and three men who have no idea she’s mixed them up, Avery doesn’t know how to fix the mess she’s made. But she knows she has to try, even if it means losing a love not even she could forget.

**If I Forget You is considered clean New Adult/Young Adult fiction appropriate for adults and young adults. It contains adult themes and issues.**

OFFICIAL IF I FORGET YOU PAGE

IF I FORGET YOU will be available mid-to-late May 2014 in hardcover, paperback, and digital formats. Audio book options are currently in negotiation.

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, If I Forget You, 13 comments

“Everybody Loves Country Music — They Just Don’t Know It Yet”

“Everybody loves country music — they just don’t know it yet.”

That’s something my brother said to me about ten months ago. That was the point I started listening to country music in earnest because I was writing Out of Tune, my “country music book.” I wasn’t too keen on country at first, but now my car’s radio station is permanently stuck on the local country music station. It’s all I want to listen to now. I was converted, so to speak.

There are lots of different kinds of country, so it’s kind of silly to me when I hear someone say they HATE ALL COUNTRY. There’s country folk, bluegrass, classic country, country pop, country rock, etc. There are a lot more genres than that, but those are the main ones I’ve found.

COUNTRY FOLK

Think John Denver. Who doesn’t like a good John Denver song every now and then? “I’m leeeeeavin’ on a jet plane!!!!”

Country folk has been described as a mellower and gentler form of country music with more emphasis on song writing than vocals. Many of the artists described as country folk are respected more in mainstream country circles for their song writing abilities. The lyrics of the songs tend to be more thoughtful and emotionally complex than mainstream country. ~ Wikipedia

BLUEGRASS

Think the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? Think “You Are My Sunshine”. Alan Jackson has a fantastic album dedicated to Bluegrass titled, The Bluegrass Album.

Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music, and a sub-genre of country music. Bluegrass was inspired by the music of Appalachia. It has mixed roots in Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and English traditional music, and also later influenced by the music of African-Americans through incorporation of jazz elements. ~ Wikipedia

CLASSIC COUNTRY (whee!)

Think Johnny Cash. Have you seen Walk the Line? Yeah, go watch it.

The classic country format can actually be further divided into two formats. The first specializes in hits from the 1920s through the early 1970s (thus including music that is older than almost any other radio format in the United States), and focus primarily on innovators and artists from country music’s Golden Age (including Hank Williams, George Jones and Johnny Cash). The other focuses on hits from the 1960s (including some the above-mentioned performers) through early 1990s, some pre-1960 music, latter-day Golden Age stars and innovators such as Waylon Jennings,Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard) to newer recurrent hits from current-day artists such as George Strait, Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson and Reba McEntire. ~ Wikipedia

COUNTRY ROCK

THIS is the country my husband adores — yet he claims to hate country. (Shhh, he doesn’t really hate country if he likes this stuff) Think The Eagles and Bob Dylan.

Country rock is a subgenre of country music, formed from the fusion of rock with country. The term is generally used to refer to the wave of rock musicians who began to record country-flavored records in the late 1960s and early 1970s, beginning with Bob Dylan and The Byrds; reaching its greatest popularity in the 1970s with artists like Emmylou Harris and the Eagles. ~ Wikipedia

COUNTRY POP

If you “hate country,” this is probably what you hate. Think Garth Brooks, Miranda Lambert, Carrie Underwood, Keith Urban. This is the country I mostly listen to, but I get back to the roots of country and listen to folk and bluegrass as well.

Country pop, with roots in both the countrypolitan sound and in soft rock, is a subgenre of country music that first emerged in the 1970s. Although the term first referred to country music songs and artists that crossed over to Top 40 radio, country pop
acts are now more likely to cross over to adult contemporary. ~ Wikipedia

So chances are, you don’t really hate country. You  just think you do because you haven’t given it a chance yet. I know I thought I hated country since I grew up in a tiny hick town where country was the rule, not the exception. Country is more popular than I’ve always thought, though. When I announced over a year ago that I was going to write a “country music book”, I was blown away by how many people said they love country. I think since country truly does reach down to the roots of who we are, it has the potential to touch everyone.

Oh, and if you’re a Firefly fan, I feel strongly that you’re country at heart.

Do you hate country? Love it? I’d love to hear where you stand on your music preferences.

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in About Me, Out of Tune, 14 comments

Sneak Peek — Out of Tune

michelle-d-argyle-out-of-tune-cover-web

Twenty-year-old Maggie Roads’ parents are legendary in the country music world. She wants nothing more than to follow in their footsteps, but the limelight isn’t reserved for singers who can’t carry a tune, let alone keep a rhythm.

When her parents tell her they’re getting divorced, Maggie decides it’s time to leave home and take her future into her own hands. Moving in with Cole, her best friend and sometimes boyfriend, might not be the best of ideas, but she’s got to start somewhere. Their off-and-on romance gets even more complicated when Maggie crushes on her new voice teacher, Nathan, who unlocks her stunning potential. A sensational music career of her own is finally within reach, but Maggie might need more than perfect pitch to find what she’s really looking for.

Out of Tune is a clean novel suitable for young adult to adult readers.

It’s a little less than a month before Out of Tune is officially released. For a long time I’ve gone back and forth with this book — especially when my publisher told me they were closing their doors and that Out of Tune would be mine to do with as I pleased. At the time, I had submitted the novel and it was with my editor there. It was a tough decision, honestly. I think Out of Tune is marketable enough to publish with a publisher (dare I say even a big publisher?), but now I was faced with publishing it on my own.

You have to understand that I thought this book was going to come out in the spring of 2014 with my publisher. My little heart was set on it. I had already made plans, and since I had some good momentum built up with my other books, I didn’t want to throw this one into the querying trenches and cross my fingers that maybe an agent would sign it in a decent amount of time, and maybe they’d think it didn’t need to be completely rewritten, and maybe they’d pitch it to some great editors at great big houses, and maybe it would sell and maybe it would come out before 2016 or 2017 (yes, big publishing is that slow). All of it was a Big Fat Maybe, and well, since I have momentum, why would I do that with this book when it was already with an amazing editor and I know how to publish my own work, already have a business set up, and even a good cover? So that’s where we are, and I’m excited that Out of Tune will be released December 3, 2013.

So, in all that excitement, here’s some more information about the creation of Out of Tune — the official novel that has made me a Huge Country Music fan for life.

BOOK TRAILER

Yay! There’s a book trailer for Out of Tune! 

IDEA

The idea for Out of Tune came to me probably about six or seven years ago. I have always wanted to play the guitar. I still don’t have one, but I would like to get one some day when I can afford it, and I’d like to take some lessons and learn how to play a few songs. Maybe even sing. Gulp. But the closest I could get to for the moment was write a story about a girl who plays the guitar and sings. When I started thinking about plot possibilities and themes and conflict, I decided, well heck, what if this girl can’t sing? What if she’s so bad that everyone, even her parents, are embarrassed for her? It all took off from there.

The funniest thing of all is that I knew I wanted this book to be about country music, but that I didn’t really like or know country music. I mean, I know it, kind of … because I grew up in a town where the high school is next to a dairy farm. Yes. Cows. Every football game was bathed in the scent of cows and fresh manure. We won a lot of games because of that since the other teams weren’t used to it and we were. Probably half the population of my high school owned cowboy boots, or at least a hat and a pair of Wranglers. And a lot of my friends listened to country music. Every dance played a  lot of country. I even knew how to line dance. But … I resisted country with every fiber of my being. Now, though, after immersing myself in country music for almost 11 months since starting the novel, I love country more than any other music. I got back to my roots, and I’ve finally accepted them. Because of that, Out of Tune is very close to my heart.

TIME

I started writing Out of Tune in January of 2013, this year. I finished it the first week of March. I even queried the dang thing, with some interest but not much luck. I also submitted it to Rhemalda Publishing, my publisher at the time. After some initial revisions, they told me I needed to rewrite the entire novel. It was written in first person present (not my strongest POV), and they wanted it rewritten in third person past. So I tried it for a few chapters, realized they were correct, and rewrote the entire novel in a few weeks. It was so much better, and I’ll be forever grateful to them for their suggestions and help.

EXCERPT

Want a little peek inside Out of Tune? This scene takes place after Maggie has moved in with her best friend, Cole. He’s in a band, and she’s been waiting patiently to sing with them … even though Cole is all of a sudden not as supportive as Maggie thinks he should be.

'Click Here to Read the 'Out of Tune' Excerpt'

 

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, Out of Tune, 10 comments

Sneak Peek — Catch

michelle-d-argyle-catch-cover

When eighteen-year-old Miranda chases a purse snatcher on the Las Vegas Strip, the last thing she expects is for the pursuit to turn into an extended game of hide-and-seek. All Miranda wants are the old black and white photographs buried at the bottom of her purse. They’re the only things she has left of the grandmother she never knew. But how much is she willing to put on the line to save them? And is it possible she’s falling in love with a thief?

My friend Natalie Whipple calls Catch a mini book. I like the sound of that! It’s not as pretentious as the term “novella”, nor as dismissive as “short story”. Whatever you want to call Catch, it’s 20,000 words (most novels are at least over 50,000) and you can probably read it in less than two hours if you’re not interrupted — longer if you’re a slower reader, of course.

So, want to know some stats about Catch? Here goes!

IDEA

I honestly can’t remember how I came up with the idea for Catch. All I know is that I wanted to write a short story and publish it on my own. This happened before my publisher informed me that they were closing their doors. So, although it may seem I decided to publish Catch out of nowhere once I made the announcement that I would be publishing all my own work, I had actually started writing Catch long before that, and had discussed with my publisher that it would be an independent project.

Since Catch takes place in Vegas, the idea of games is prominent. It’s one of the reasons I was so excited to write the story. Falling for a guy amidst all the chances of winning and losing? Winner!

TIME

I started writing Catch the middle of August and finished it in fourteen days. I think the only reason I finished it so quickly (for me, anyway) is because I started on the day my daughter began first grade. That meant she would be in school for six hours every day, giving me plenty of time to work! And work, I did. I received a bit of feedback for the story from one reader, did revisions, and then sent off the story to my editor. Edits went super fast because the story is short, and soon we were into copyedits, proofreading, and layout. Yay! Overall, from start to finish, Catch was conceived and published in 25 days. I definitely plan to do more “mini-books” like this in the future.

EXCERPT

Want a little peek inside Catch? Here’s a scene from the middle of the book. Miranda is in the midst of communicating with the guy who stole her purse. He’s made a deal with her that as long as they play hide-and-seek, he’ll return something of hers from the purse. Of course, all she really wants is the photographs of her grandmother she left in the purse, but Ollie isn’t about to give those up since playing the game is just too much fun.

'Click Here to Read the 'Catch' Excerpt'

If you’d like to order directly from Michelle, please choose the ‘MDA Books’ link below.

PrintKindle | Smashwords | Nook | Kobo | iBooks | Google BooksMDA Books

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, Catch, 8 comments

What is New Adult Fiction and Should You Be Reading It?

There’s a not-so-new emerging genre out there on the market these days called New Adult fiction. Wikipedia states that this genre was coined by St. Martins Press in 2009 when they held a contest. In the contest description, it says:

“Since twenty-somethings are devouring YA, St. Martin’s Press is seeking fiction similar to YA that can be published and marketed as adult — a sort of an “older YA” or “new adult.”’

1. AGE

When I heard about NA, I had hope. This described what I was writing. New Adult covers the age range of 18 – 26, or in more vague terms (since I think 26 might be too strict of a cut-off age), the age in which a person is no longer in high school, but has not yet established a career or a family. But sometimes NA covers teens in the later years of high school, like Colleen Hoover’s CRASH and HOPELESS series. We’ll get to why down below.

2. THEME

You know? That limbo stage. The party stage. The WHO THE HECK AM I? stage. The newfound I’M INDEPENDENT stage. That’s what I write and it finally has a specific genre publishers seem to be embracing (at least beginning to). The themes of New Adult tend to be structured around living on your own for the first time (or preparing to), learning how to make ends meet, establishing a career, entering or preparing for marriage and maybe even pregnancy, going to college, experiencing sex, experimenting with drinking and drugs (more so than in high school), entering more adult peer groups, and generally exploring any other adult experience that is new to that character.

3. IS NA ONLY ABOUT OVERSEXED/UNDERSEXED TEENS ENTERING ADULTHOOD?

I’ve noticed New Adult is starting to pair up with descriptions like “YA-like stories, but with more sex, and more detailed sex, at that.” When I go on Amazon, I see countless New Adult books that are selling big, especially ones with descriptions that say “For Mature Audiences Only”. You see, this is such a developing genre, and I have a feeling that it will go through some pretty big mood swings and phases before/if it lands into a more solid place.

BUT NO, NA IS NOT JUST ABOUT SEX. Like any other genre, NA can be about many, many, many different things. Story lines featuring a lot of sex or virgins looking for sex or someone recovering from rape, or anything along those lines, seem to be the popular thing at the moment. But there are other NA genres, ranging from urban fantasy to paranormal to dystopian to historical to literary, etc. Take your pick.

I’ve found that Romantic New Adult fiction is fiction that uses the romantic relationships in the story to further the main character’s self-discovery and complete his/her character arc. 

4. CROSSOVER?

I also want to point out that New Adult might have a fancy schmancy name now, but I think some books that neatly fall into its category are still being marketed as YA. Here’s a few.

Where She Went by Gayle Forman — It’s a sequel to a YA novel, sure, but it’s 100% New Adult, in my opinion. Two main characters living separately on their own, establishing their careers, not married yet, looking for who they are. By the way, I adore this book. It’s heavy on the romantic themes, but I wouldn’t call it romance.

Just One Day by Gayle Forman — Can you tell I love Gayle Forman? I think if anyone writes anything close to what I write, it’s her. This book strikes me as NA as well. It’s about a girl who just graduated and is on a trip in Europe. This one felt more romance to me.

Wanderlove by Kirsten Hubbard — This is about an 18-year old who travels to Central America looking for independence and no-strings-attached hookups. It felt borderline YA/NA to me, but could easily be NA, I think. It has romantic themes, but I wouldn’t call it romance.

So why are these not NA? I’m not exactly sure, but I think it has to do with many factors. Maybe that author mostly writes YA and the publisher wants to keep all of his/her books in that category. Maybe the book, in its general feel, appeals more to a YA audience despite the age of the characters. Maybe the publisher hasn’t embraced NA yet and they prefer to market to a YA readership. There are a lot of different reasons. Either way, I think NA will probably always be a somewhat blurry category, just like in some areas YA is blurry.

5. WRITING STYLE

I’ve read 32 YA books since January of this year. Most of those 32 books were written in first person. Many of them were first person present. I haven’t read that many NA books so far, but I’ve heard that like YA, they are also mainly written in first person present. As many of you may know, I tried to write my current NA novel in first person present. It didn’t work. This taught me that despite popular trends, you shouldn’t write a book according to what everyone else is doing. Duh. So my NA novel will now be in the apparently unpopular third person past tense. Like any other genre, NA can be written in whatever tense and POV the author wishes and it will still be NA.

6. SHOULD YOU BE READING NA?

That’s a loaded question, isn’t it? I’ll say this — like covers, sometimes books shouldn’t be judged by their genre. I think if a book’s description appeals to you, even if it’s in a genre you normally don’t read, give it a try. Like a friend of mine says, don’t be a genre snob. 

I’d like to know how many of you have read anything you might think is New Adult? Have you heard the term before? What do you think of it?

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in All Things Publishing, 4 comments

Accepting Yourself as a Blind Author

I’m deep into revisions on my novel, Out of Tune, which I submitted to my publisher a few weeks ago. I waited and waited for an answer and received a lovely editorial letter thick with the message, “Your book is great! But you need to change all this stuff before it’s ready for publication.” And it’s some big stuff. Ouch, because I thought all the big revisions I did before sending it in were enough. Wrong. So, that’s what I’ve been busy doing lately because #1, I want a publishing contract for this book so bad, and #2, I want to get this book out of my way so I can continue working on my new novel, the forgetting book.

As some of you may know, I tried to query Out of Tune awhile ago. I wrote the thing in nine weeks back in January and February, and can you believe I thought it was a great novel at that point? These were my thoughts:

This book is so good! I ADORED writing it, so it MUST be great. It won’t need that much work at all. Remember Pieces? I wrote that one fast too and it all went so smoothly, even with revisions. This one will be the same! I’m growing so much as an author. I SO ROCK! I’m going to query this and get an agent and go super-big super-fast and my life will be all sorts of happy-unicorns-and-cupcakes-sugar-induced awesomeness.

Yeah, kind of forgot that Pieces is a sequel/companion to an existing book. Characters already solidified. Backstory already completed. World already created. Out of Tune is a whole new story, a whole new world, a whole new set of problems.

I was so blind.

I was stupid and queried it way, way, way, way too early. I had beta readers for it before that, and I did some big revisions, but nothing painfully extensive. Obviously, I didn’t get an agent. I think I screwed up some good opportunities I probably won’t ever get back, so yay for me. You know what I was thinking? Really? I thought:

The more I write, the faster I should get, the less work I’ll have to do on each novel.

To an extent, that might be true, but I was blinded by that thought. I let it give me an excuse to be lazy and arrogant. So, I realized if I want a book out in any decent amount of time, I’d better submit Out of Tune to the publisher of my other books instead of chasing after different publishing opportunities for the next year or longer. And I love my publisher, so it’s not like this is a bad thing, far from it. But now that I’m slogging my way through some heavy revisions, embarrassed out of my mind that I queried this book in such a horrible state, I’m learning my lesson that every first draft I finish is going to suck. This is what I said to a friend last night:

It’s just … you know, after doing revisions like this (and it’s not like I don’t go through this with EVERY book), I go to work on a new book, and I’m terrified. I keep thinking, I’m going to do everything wrong and there’s no way to stop it. The only thing to do is just write it and then fix it later, no matter how long it takes or how hard it is.

I’m blind. In every first draft I write, it seems like I’m totally 100% blind, traveling through an unknown world, charting things I have no knowledge of, and most of it will need major reworking.

I’ll admit, I feel completely foolish putting up this post, because most of this seems like it should be obvious to any author. I just thought that since I’m writing my tenth novel, I would have figured it all out by now. Apparently not. So learn from my mistakes, I suppose, and accept your blindness and keep writing anyway. Unless you’re so brilliant that you churn out perfect first drafts. In that case, can we switch brains?

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, Out of Tune, Pieces, Writing Process, 12 comments

Bonded Book Club Visit

Bonded; Three Fairy Tales, One BondOn Wednesday night, I went to a book club run by my friend Ilima Todd. It was her month to choose the book, so she chose Bonded, which makes me feel all sorts of special. Thanks, Ilima!

I’ve done a few book club visits now. I think this was my fifth visit, but the first one I’ve done for Bonded. I was a little worried about how it all might work with three different books. Would it be too much to discuss all of those? Turns out several readers didn’t have the chance to finish all three books, but it was still easy to have a great discussion. Everyone was so kind, even when we discussed things not everyone particularly liked. Mostly, the discussion revolved around questions everyone had about the characters or the plot. What I find most interesting is that these questions are ones I’ve heard time and time again (especially when Cinders was first published). It’s fascinating because readers seem to gravitate toward the same issues every single time. At first, I worried this is because I’ve done something wrong in my writing. Did I not spend enough time on certain aspects? Did I leave a few things too vague? Did I do it all WRONG? (That’s like my greatest fear, ever, mind you).

I’ve realized over time, though, that I haven’t written anything wrong. As I’ve discussed before, there are no right answers. Everyone brings different things to a novel when they read it, but that’s why it is so interesting how different readers ask me the same questions over and over. To me, that means I did something right. The story I’ve written obviously begs different questions and different themes that make a large group of readers stop and think about those same things in a critical way. It’s more than entertainment, and that’s something pretty great.

I think attending book groups is one of my favorite things to do as author. It’s not because attention is focused on me and my book. It’s because I get an insight, in person, how my book has affects readers. I’ve heard the highest praise in these book groups and the harshest criticism. I’ve grown a lot because of it. Wouldn’t trade any of it for anything! Book clubs are awesome. I don’t belong to one, but someday I might. Do you belong to one?

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Bonded, Books, 7 comments

Bonded Launch Party at The King’s English Bookstore

First, a suspenseful story.

I live about 40 minutes away from the bookstore that hosted me for my launch party. There’s a stretch of freeway between me and Salt Lake City, which means I was looking forward to a nice drive with three friends. Forty minutes of talk-time isn’t anything I’ll ever complain about! Unless, of course, I almost hit a deer on the freeway while we’re talking. It was rolling across the road, apparently just having been hit by a car. I was barreling along at about 68 mph, when my friend in the front seat pointed out that something wasn’t right up ahead (note, “up ahead” means, like, a split second up ahead). Since about six years earlier, I ran over (it was lying in the road, just hit) an entire elk on a backroad on my way to work (in a sports car, mind you), I had that flash through my head as my brain recognized the deer flopping across the road ahead of us. I swerved because I was thinking there is no way I’m running over a huge freaking deer again. I think my brain registered there wasn’t a car next to me, otherwise, I would have caused a nasty accident. Later, we learned the deer did cause a four-car pileup. Probably the people right behind us. I am very lucky to have missed the deer and not hit another car at the same time. Very lucky.

So that out of the way, we made it to my launch party right at the starting time, thank goodness! We could have all been in the hospital, but for the next three months, I’m thanking God in my prayers for keeping me and my friends safe.

The launch party itself was a fantastic, super, amazingly wonderful success! I wasn’t too nervous, I had fun reading my excerpt, and two of my good friends came dressed up as characters from the book. My six-year-old was well-behaved, and even asked a cute question during the Q&A section. There were a lot of people in the signing line (I consider it a total success if at least one book sells!), and I had so many friends and family show up, I went home with tears of gratitude in my eyes.

I want to thank every single person who came, and a huge thank you to The Kings English for hosting me! A launch party is a celebration, and that is exactly what this felt like.

Thank you to Janci Patterson and Lisa Shafer for most of these pics!

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Bonded, Books

The Post-Revision Antsy Blues

So I’m not really into post-revision on Pieces yet since I’m waiting for two more readers to get me feedback, but after getting feedback from my other readers, and doing major slit-my-wrist revisions on the book, I’m sitting here staring at my computer and wondering what the heck to do with myself. I’m antsy. I’m nervous. I’m hungry, but I don’t want to eat. My brain feels like it was a rubberband all stretched out and then somebody let go. Now I’m lying on the floor, helpless. I’d watch a movie, but I’m too antsy. I’d read a book, but I’m so tired of reading after reading through my book like five times, forward and backward and up and down. The worst thing of all is that I’m exhausted. I’ve been exhausted for a long time now because when I do revisions, I DO REVISIONS. I don’t do anything else. I don’t do laundry. I don’t cook (much). I don’t clean (much). I don’t sleep (much). I just revise until I make myself sick, which I’ve done.

Does anyone else get like this?

Also, let me clarify what revisions are. Jennifer Hubbard did a great post about what revisions are for her. She sums it up better than I can.

As Jane Lebak notes, this is about more than fixing commas. This is about deleting entire scenes, moving chapters around, writing new scenes. Bringing in new characters, or getting rid of old ones, or merging two characters who have too-similar reasons for being in the story. Changing the plot: changing what happens or when or in what order. Chopping unnecessary pages from the beginning, or the end, or even the middle. Introducing new subplots. Jane Lebak discusses the most thorough kind of revision: the rewrite that starts from a blank page. Sometimes it does come down to that.

And, yeah, I’ve done the rewrite that starts from a blank page before. More than once. Thankfully, this book does not need that extensive of revisions. I’ve restructured and rewritten and added and deleted and shuffled stuff around. Now I’m onto the line stuff, and then a final read-through for copyedits. Then it all goes to my editor and I get to do all of the edits she sends to me. Then more copyedits.

I guess all I’m saying is when people ask me how hard it is write a book, I honestly don’t even know where to start. It’s definitely a job that goes beyond the mind. It’s physical too. Revisions, for me, are the equivalent of running a marathon. I’m pretty sure I end up burning as many calories.

The post-revision antsy blues get me every time. Like my friend Becca said to me, last time this happened to her, she sat in her office chair in the middle of the room and just spun around forever. Sometimes that’s all your mind can handle! I really just don’t know what to do with myself while my brain gets back to normal. Yoga. Maybe some yoga.

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, Pieces, 16 comments

Daily Dish Utah | My First Experience on TV

As I spoke about earlier, I was invited to interview on Utah’s Daily Dish show, hosted by Good Things Utah. Nicea and Brianne were wonderful hosts, and I felt at home and comfortable. Let me just say that I wasn’t so nervous to actually talk on television as I was about everything surrounding it. First of all, I was only given two days’ notice, and second, it’s in my nature to worry about little details when it’s something new. I worried about directions and driving and parking and getting into the right place. I worried about what to wear, how to do my hair, which jewelry to pick out, which shoes to put on, how I would answer the questions, etc. On and on. I honestly don’t know how news people do this every day! But then again, it’s not in my blood to just do this sort of thing as a career. But I suppose being an author, you have to have to have some level of comfort-zone with being in the public eye.

My dear friend, Alicia, offered to drive me to Salt Lake City to the news station building, and another friend offered to watch my daughter all morning. So a huge thanks to these two! My poor hubby had to work. I wish he could have been there.

All in all, this was an amazing experience and a wonderful opportunity not to pass up. I had the chance to talk about my work in a professional time and space, and I am honored to have done so. I don’t know if doing this will garner more sales, but that certainly isn’t why this was such a wonderful opportunity. I realized something important today during this interview—in the end, it does not matter what kind of “level” I see myself at in the publishing world, because I often see myself as inferior for so many reasons. But all that really matters was the two lovely hosts interviewing me were genuinely excited about my book and the story it tells.

My friend Alicia took me to a lovely bakery in downtown Salt Lake. I bought some cannolis, my favorite pastry. And we had some breakfast since I was not able to eat before the interview (I was too nervous!) It was an exciting morning and then a relaxing breakfast.

A huge thank you to ABC-4 and the hosts at The Daily Dish for interviewing me today!

To watch the interview, CLICK HERE.

Posted by Michelle D. Argyle in Books, The Breakaway, 0 comments